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... 100 days for India's Mars spacecraft's tryst with red planet ... Exactly 100 days from today, India's Mars spacecraft is scheduled for a rendezvous with the red planet as it is rapidly coasting towards its target covering almost 70 per cent of its journey. On September 24, a very significant technological milestone of Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) called Mars Orbit Insertion is planned, Indian Space Research Organisation's Bangalore headquarter said. MOM, which is rapidly racing towards its target in its 300-day voyage in deep space, is at a radio distance of 108 million km from earth. A signal takes six minutes to reach Earth from MOM.

... 100 days for India's Mars spacecraft's tryst with red planet ... Exactly 100 days from today, India's Mars spacecraft is scheduled for a rendezvous with the red planet as it is rapidly coasting towards its target covering almost 70 per cent of its journey. On September 24, a very significant technological milestone of Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) called Mars Orbit Insertion is planned, Indian Space Research Organisation's Bangalore headquarter said. MOM, which is rapidly racing towards its target in its 300-day voyage in deep space, is at a radio distance of 108 million km from earth. A signal takes six minutes to reach Earth from MOM.

... 100 days for India's Mars spacecraft's tryst with red planet ... Exactly 100 days from today, India's Mars spacecraft is scheduled for a rendezvous with the red planet as it is rapidly coasting towards its target covering almost 70 per cent of its journey. On September 24, a very significant technological milestone of Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) called Mars Orbit Insertion is planned, Indian Space Research Organisation's Bangalore headquarter said. MOM, which is rapidly racing towards its target in its 300-day voyage in deep space, is at a radio distance of 108 million km from earth. A signal takes six minutes to reach Earth from MOM.

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SMS turns 21 amid declining texting trend - SMS (Short Message Service), that is now used more frequently than voice calling on mobile phones completes two decades of its existence on December 3. Today more than two lakh SMSs are sent every second, but this 160-character craze began when Neil Papworth, a 22-year-old British engineer, sent the first text message via Vodafone's UK network to an Orbitel 901 mobile phone. The message said, "Merry Chistmas." There was a gap of eight years from when SMS was first envisaged by Finnish civil servant Matti Makkonen at a telecommunication conference in 1984 to the first actual SMS being sent outside laboratory conditions.

SMS turns 21 amid declining texting trend - SMS (Short Message Service), that is now used more frequently than voice calling on mobile phones completes two decades of its existence on December 3. Today more than two lakh SMSs are sent every second, but this 160-character craze began when Neil Papworth, a 22-year-old British engineer, sent the first text message via Vodafone's UK network to an Orbitel 901 mobile phone. The message said, "Merry Chistmas." There was a gap of eight years from when SMS was first envisaged by Finnish civil servant Matti Makkonen at a telecommunication conference in 1984 to the first actual SMS being sent outside laboratory conditions.

SMS turns 21 amid declining texting trend - SMS (Short Message Service), that is now used more frequently than voice calling on mobile phones completes two decades of its existence on December 3. Today more than two lakh SMSs are sent every second, but this 160-character craze began when Neil Papworth, a 22-year-old British engineer, sent the first text message via Vodafone's UK network to an Orbitel 901 mobile phone. The message said, "Merry Chistmas." There was a gap of eight years from when SMS was first envisaged by Finnish civil servant Matti Makkonen at a telecommunication conference in 1984 to the first actual SMS being sent outside laboratory conditions.

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NASA satellite to crash into the Earth on Friday A satellite that is not functioning properly may fall out of its orbit, back to the Earth this Friday. Scientists are still not able to conclude as to where the satellite would crash. The satellite weighs 6.5 tones and is an Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was carried into its orbit by a space shuttle in 1991. The UARS completed the task for which it was placed in its orbit in 2005 and since then it has been losing its altitude and moving towards the Earth. The 35-foot-long, 15-foot diameter is expected to enter the Earth’s atmosphere on the coming Friday and although most part of the satellite has been lost due to incineration, scientists are expecting around 26 pieces to enter the Earth’s atmosphere and they will weigh close to 500 kg. The satellite’s orbit passes from the north of Canada to the Southern part of South America. Most probably the debris will fall into the sea or on uninhabited land. Such incidents occur every year but there have not been any casualties till date and the probability of the satellite debris to hit a human is one in 3200. The biggest chunk of the satellite that will enter the Earth’s atmosphere will weigh close to 151 kg. source: techieask.com

NASA satellite to crash into the Earth on Friday A satellite that is not functioning properly may fall out of its orbit, back to the Earth this Friday. Scientists are still not able to conclude as to where the satellite would crash. The satellite weighs 6.5 tones and is an Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was carried into its orbit by a space shuttle in 1991. The UARS completed the task for which it was placed in its orbit in 2005 and since then it has been losing its altitude and moving towards the Earth. The 35-foot-long, 15-foot diameter is expected to enter the Earth’s atmosphere on the coming Friday and although most part of the satellite has been lost due to incineration, scientists are expecting around 26 pieces to enter the Earth’s atmosphere and they will weigh close to 500 kg. The satellite’s orbit passes from the north of Canada to the Southern part of South America. Most probably the debris will fall into the sea or on uninhabited land. Such incidents occur every year but there have not been any casualties till date and the probability of the satellite debris to hit a human is one in 3200. The biggest chunk of the satellite that will enter the Earth’s atmosphere will weigh close to 151 kg. source: techieask.com

NASA satellite to crash into the Earth on Friday A satellite that is not functioning properly may fall out of its orbit, back to the Earth this Friday. Scientists are still not able to conclude as to where the satellite would crash. The satellite weighs 6.5 tones and is an Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was carried into its orbit by a space shuttle in 1991. The UARS completed the task for which it was placed in its orbit in 2005 and since then it has been losing its altitude and moving towards the Earth. The 35-foot-long, 15-foot diameter is expected to enter the Earth’s atmosphere on the coming Friday and although most part of the satellite has been lost due to incineration, scientists are expecting around 26 pieces to enter the Earth’s atmosphere and they will weigh close to 500 kg. The satellite’s orbit passes from the north of Canada to the Southern part of South America. Most probably the debris will fall into the sea or on uninhabited land. Such incidents occur every year but there have not been any casualties till date and the probability of the satellite debris to hit a human is one in 3200. The biggest chunk of the satellite that will enter the Earth’s atmosphere will weigh close to 151 kg. source: techieask.com

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